NPR on Prince, The Replacements, Minneapolis Music Scene & 1990’s sax rock band Morphine R.I.P.

princetwoNPR had a whole feature on Prince and Minneapolis today that made me cry when I heard another Minneapolis band, The Replacments. They also played Rrrriott GiRrrl Band “Babes in Toyland.” Were they from Minnesota as well?

I don’t care how Prince died. Everyone has a bottom line. His? To continue performing a bit and KILL THE PAIN. I’m in the same boat.

Only I went cold turkey three or four weeks ago. I slept thru most of it. I went down for a week.

After 16 years of safe use that restored function and allowed me to lift gentle weights, ride the life cycle and swim, The side effects  got to the me. The medicine, even at 1/3 the dose I’d taken in previous years, ( according to experts, EVERYONE goes up in dosage and tolerance) my body shut down. I quit.

If I’m such a ‘junkie’ as the former BFF said, why are there still 100 of The MS is still here? Answer: I never took the full dose prescribed because I lived in fear of terrible, disabling flareups from the “Interventional Pain Therapy” spinal injecttions,  all ten of them 200.00 each and a failure. I also did piltes and paid for four expensive and pointless rounds of PT, stuff I could do at home and electrostim making me worse.

I’m sorry Prince and the 20% of pain patients who become problem abusers   turning to  the streets for a cheaper fix and a cheaper high have to die. I pay for the high they’re chasing. This kills me.

There are measures like Suboxone that are way safer tho you have to be rediagnosed and the idea is to wean ya down. What about the pain? I’ve tried everything, holistic, medical, athletic, hydration, cutting back to gentle exercise but at least “The Box” won’t kill you and buys time while you look for something safer. The truth is, Opiates are a naturally occurring substance, much more  natural than the primitive nerve burning  Coolief, which would work for me but Medicare doesn’t cover it.

The doctor wouldn’t  give me any estimate of my of pocket responsibility or help me set up a payment plan.

So the one ‘respectable’ thing that I would have paid thousands for to get a year of comfort is out of my financial reach and  I have money, too.. It’s called “Coolief,”they have no 800 number and Medicare should be prior authorizing and covering.

It’s three years old. They haven’t caught up.

But back to Prince.

I was listening to Sirius 27, “Deep Tracks” and they had an interview with a local yokel music critic speaking about Prince’s role in Minneapolis, currently a music scene in the grieving process. Then they played a band that should have been a big hit but just …sort of slipped between the cracks. They were on a major record label, critically acclaimed, alt guitar pop with a grunge overtone in the 90’s all of the right ingredients. I know from beign married to a Record Guy (Geffen Records…Eagles, Joni Mitchell, Beck, XTC, Aerosmith in the late 90’s, Jackal, That Dog, Nirvana, Courtney Love, Elastica, Garbage…a boutique, eclectic artist roster from way back) but back to yesterday’s NPR Broadcast

“The Replacements,” Minneapolis other “Favorite Sons”  (‘Merry Go Round; ‘I will Dare’  were songs) were often compared to a British outfit called “Big Star.” Neither of them made it. Just like Prince.

 

For Prince’s sake, Cut 2 chase, cut the carnage, widen access to MAT & wipe out black market!!

atcomputerprincetwo

I heard about Prince. So tragic. The Suboxone thing might not be the answer but it does reduce mortality by accidental and intentional overdose by 50%. Restricting access and insisting everyone immediately wean off does nothing to address the 8 in ten drug abusers/addicts who originally took narcotics for pain, both short term and chronic. Studies show 99% of them will relapse back onto heroin or worse. When you go to the street you get no medical warnings or advice and you never know what’s in the drugs you are buying.

I don’t think “The Box” is the Answer, in fact, I wonder about it being its’ own Satan, the negative facts suppressed for profit.

Everyone makes out, the pharmacies, drug dealers, doctors, drug companies…everyone but us.

Rapper Scarface: “We Can’t afford our drugs so we all gonna die CVS is slingin dope on every block worldwide!!!!!” They don’t have any responsibility to use because they’re in healthcare…why should they????? Not necessarily. Then there’s the beaurocratic nightmare of federal officials trying to do the right thing coming up against powerful lobbyists who want the Oxy to continue because it IS safer if used as directed. I had conservative, safe, minimal use of MS contin for 16 years before I quit because of side effects, my body unable to relieve itself of the meals eaten yesterday. That can kill you too. Then there’s the prescription laxatives that only buy a few more years of time. But we’re all buying time.

I for one am sooooo tired of paying for everyone who is chasing a high. I kid you not. I used to be an addict, now I’m not. Furthermore, I don’t abuse drugs…they abuse me. That’s why I quit. Cold Turkey. Done. Hundreds of leftovers left over that I rarely think about. Might need them if I get in an accident and access is so limited I can’t stand it. I’ve had ‘failed surgery syndrome’ when the bones of my feet wouldn’t knit together lasting three years after surgery, steel pins holding my feet together. Foot pain worse than back pain. Of COURS I took narcotics. Then, when they healed I immediately stopped. But the point is I was in legitimate pain due to doctor error and on pain meds long term and then stopped for ten years until my next ortho operation, thanks to ongoing exercise bulimia.  The switcher upper in my fight against cocaine addiction to suppress my appetite. It’s all sort of a hazy dream and my family has now disowned me. Bipolar My fault. My foot problems, my fault. Every new side effect or illness, my fault. My choice. This has been going on since DX.

I’ve been dealing with a night mare that would drive someone less stable to drink or another unhealthy coping  mechanism. Stigmatized by family since my diagnosis of bipolar, Stigma and I are fast friends. Because it came from family I associate it with love and don’t know when to walk away like in the case of the “BFF calling the cops on me and saying I’m suicidal, even though she’s got the plan and the means to attempt it for a fourth time secretly stashed away in her closet. And then this…….It’s about reverse diversity….do ya feel me?

Hey you guys…I just wrote this up. A formal complaint of long term abuse I endured by Quest laboratories over a seven year period because I was ashamed, cowed and didn’t think I deserved better. They almost succeeded in denying me my critical lab services to get my most important mood stabilizer. They are NOT going to get away with it. I may be one of the ‘little’ people but I’m “mad as hell and not going to take Stigma any more.”

Local Lab Chain’s Long Term Abuse, shame shame shame on YOU@!

 

 

To: Medicare’s Beneficiaries and Family Centers Care and Quality Improvement Center for quality Improvement Organization.

Re: Systemic and local problem in my seven years as a monthly client of Quest Labs, 3343 Sheridan Street Location, Hollywood, Florida. 33021-3606. (the last four digits of zip were hard to read).

This long letter, I’m sorry but there’s a lot to cover, chronicles a litany of abusive treatment, jeapordy of my health, healthcare and access to a most critical medication by one of your providers.

It’s a case of stigma, and if you get to page 8 you’ll see the ‘diversity in reverse’ racial discriminatory aspect as well. I don’t come out and say who’s what color but I do remember distinctly a conversation I had with the supervisor whose name is Augusta.  You’ll be able to see this sad scenario in full blown Technicolor. But there are other types of stigma, abuse, and discrimination as well. A systemic aspect infecting all aspects of the corporation. It can’t continue. You must be informed of this so it doesn’t happen to anyone else.

(I will be sending this to better business bureau, chamber of commerce and any other regulatory agencies I can find too. ‘

Do you want to hear the rest of it?  Let me know.

Thanks to Opinionated Man and his support and encouragement

Chickencoop

Sometimes the truth hurts. And I was what Jason calls a Lazyass blogger. I think his articles are hilarious. I’ve actually printed and saved them all. He’s given my coverage on Prince and the last minute mission to save his life some reblogs so you can know that something is going on. There’s a drug with indications for pain that they are with holding from us. Making our decisions for us. But I didn’t write this to rant and rave I just wanted to thank Jason for the reblogs and let you know I’m on this story. Tomorrow my story about metabolism comes out and you can find it there as well as here.

Allison Strong

More on Prince ; Buprenorphine Mystery my note 2 Cornell MD

princetwoBelieve me, you’ll know as soon as I know.

There is this guy in our daily paper who offers answers to questions. I wrote my questions about buprenorphine. I can never get the spelling right.

One of the articles about Prince’s death dealt with the stigma of using one drug to treat a problem with another. But if he really had ruined his hips and was in pain, then he’d have needed pain care. You want to know what I think? He didn’t know who to trust. It’s tricky. You’ll see in this letter that I don’t know who to trust either.  So I wrote this guy at Cornell. I keep looking for more stories on this subject but can’t find any. Is there some conspiracy theory I’m unaware of? Could big pharma be THAT big to get in the way of generic 40 dollar a month w/o insurance priced Subutex? It’s been FDA approved for chronic pain since 81 so what’s the big issue with it? So I wrote a letter to this Cornell ‘ask the doctor’ newspaper guy at ‘ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu. If you want to know the deal as badly as I do and you never see his answer posted in my blog, feel free to ask him again these questions..It’s a public concern and a growing epidemic that some say could be solved with Suboxone, Bupenorphrine. Why Not? Why?

Dear Dr. Roach

I’ve had chronic lumbar pain for a decade. It’s impacted by a neurological condition called Tardive Dyskinesia that’s similar to Parkinson’s. I have uncontrollable muscle spasms and yelp. I’ve had every interventional pain management injection available and have spent thousands on physical therapy, pilates, herbs, eat an anti inflammatory diet, have done chiropractic, massage and acupuncture. I use mindful meditation while listening to music to. Still,  I need my meds. And hate that.

I don’t take short actings. I’ve made days-long medication ‘vacations’ to work my tolerance/dose down to 1/3 of what it was a year ago.  Even at a lower dose, the constipation is unbearable. Even on an all raw foods diet.

After a few ortho surgeries I’d been on high dose synthetics like Demerol and I had no constipation. When Prince died I read about the use of buprenorphine for chronic pain at the California “Recovery Without Walls” clinic. The use of a sublingual patch, a different way of taking it puts less strain on the liver and kidneys as they don’t have to metabolize it.  The few shreds of coverage I read in the Washington Post and said Bupenorphine  received FDA approval for chronic pain back in 1981. Yet one article about a D.C. based doctor recounted how she’d had to falsify patient’s diagnoses in order to get them treated and off of opiates for good. That’s what I want. If these synthetics truly are the second coming for long term noncancerous pain (Claimed by the newer “Butrans” transdermal patch) with a lower side effect profile and a ceiling on respiratory effects and overdose potential, why do the doctors using it claim there have been ‘challenges and conflicts’ preventing its’  widespread availability and use?

Why do some local doctors (often trained in other countries) insinuate that bupenorphrine would help my chronic pain while other doctors angrily claim it’s illegal to use it for that purpose? What are the downsides to this medication that I’m not hearing about? Allison Strong Hollywood Florida 954-922-4310

biszanta@hotmail.com

 

More on Prince & Buprenorphine Mystery my note 2 Cornell MD

princetwoBelieve me, you’ll know as soon as I know.

There is this guy in our daily paper who offers answers to questions. I wrote my questions about buprenorphine. I can never get the spelling right.

One of the articles about Prince’s death dealt with the stigma of using one drug to treat a problem with another. But if he really had ruined his hips and was in pain, then he’d have needed pain care. You want to know what I think? He didn’t know who to trust. It’s tricky. You’ll see in this letter that I don’t know who to trust either.  So I wrote this guy at Cornell. I keep looking for more stories on this subject but can’t find any. Is there some conspiracy theory I’m unaware of? Could big pharma be THAT big to get in the way of generic 40 dollar a month w/o insurance priced Subutex? It’s been FDA approved for chronic pain since 81 so what’s the big issue with it? So I wrote a letter to this Cornell ‘ask the doctor’ newspaper guy at ‘ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu. If you want to know the deal as badly as I do and you never see his answer posted in my blog, feel free to ask him again these questions..It’s a public concern and a growing epidemic that some say could be solved with Suboxone, Bupenorphrine. Why Not? Why?

Dear Dr. Roach

I’ve had chronic lumbar pain for a decade. It’s impacted by a neurological condition called Tardive Dyskinesia that’s similar to Parkinson’s. I have uncontrollable muscle spasms and yelp. I’ve had every interventional pain management injection available and have spent thousands on physical therapy, pilates, herbs, eat an anti inflammatory diet, have done chiropractic, massage and acupuncture. I use mindful meditation while listening to music to. Still,  I need my meds. And hate that.

I don’t take short actings. I’ve made days-long medication ‘vacations’ to work my tolerance/dose down to 1/3 of what it was a year ago.  Even at a lower dose, the constipation is unbearable. Even on an all raw foods diet.

After a few ortho surgeries I’d been on high dose synthetics like Demerol and I had no constipation. When Prince died I read about the use of buprenorphine for chronic pain at the California “Recovery Without Walls” clinic. The use of a sublingual patch, a different way of taking it puts less strain on the liver and kidneys as they don’t have to metabolize it.  The few shreds of coverage I read in the Washington Post and said Bupenorphine  received FDA approval for chronic pain back in 1981. Yet one article about a D.C. based doctor recounted how she’d had to falsify patient’s diagnoses in order to get them treated and off of opiates for good. That’s what I want. If these synthetics truly are the second coming for long term noncancerous pain (Claimed by the newer “Butrans” transdermal patch) with a lower side effect profile and a ceiling on respiratory effects and overdose potential, why do the doctors using it claim there have been ‘challenges and conflicts’ preventing its’  widespread availability and use?

Why do some local doctors (often trained in other countries) insinuate that bupenorphrine would help my chronic pain while other doctors angrily claim it’s illegal to use it for that purpose? What are the downsides to this medication that I’m not hearing about? Allison Strong Hollywood Florida 954-922-4310

biszanta@hotmail.com

 

Washington Post re: Prince, Buprenorphrine, barriers to access, stigma

prince

You guys….there’s a story here and it’s bigger than we know. There’s a better drug for pain, and we have no knowledge of it and even less access to it. Prince was going to go all the way to California for it. You know what killed Prince? He ran out of time and stigma. I’m having some of the same problems. The side effects are killing me. I take less than prescribed. Somedays I excruciatingly don’t take any in order to keep my dosage down. But the side effects. Buprenorphrine is cleaner, doesn’t go through your digestive tract, doesn’t burden the kidneys and even has a ceiling on how much it can affect or slow down your respiration, so it’s way safer. What is the deal????????????????? No one is talking.

By Maia Szalavitz

PostEverything

May 9

Maia Szalavitz is a journalist and author, most recently of the forthcoming “Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addictions.”

Prince performs at halftime of the Super Bowl in 2007. (JEFF HAYNES AND ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

Prince’s greatest music hit the radio while I was going off the rails during my own opioid and cocaine addiction. The young man who gave me my first injection was a massive fan and played “Kiss” for me around the same time he introduced me to the needle. I was soon hooked on both Prince and injecting.

That’s why it hit me especially hard when I learned that this musical genius’ overdose death occurred a day before he was due to start treatment. This tragedy makes clear that what likely killed him, and is killing so many others, is not just addiction itself, but the stigma we attach to it and, even worse, to the most effective treatment for it.

If we really want to stop the overdose epidemic, we need to get serious about providing the only treatment known to reduce the death rate by 50 percent to 70 percent or more: indefinite, potentially lifelong, maintenance on a legal opioid drug like methadone or buprenorphine. The data on maintenance is clear. If you increase access to it, death, crime and infectious disease drop; if you cut it short, all of those harms rise.

ADVERTISING

 

 

 

Prince was supposed to see a doctor, known for using buprenorphine to treat addiction, just a day after his death. But most patients — even most celebrity patients — do not actually get this sort of evidence-based care.

Indeed, most people concerned with opioid addiction don’t know that they should be looking for maintenance, or they avoid it thanks to the stigma against long-term medication treatment — research shows that maintenance patients experience prejudice and discrimination from family, friends, health care workers and employers. Even I perpetuated the stigma myself in the past, in an anti-methadone op-ed in the 1990s. At the time, I thought that simply having experienced addiction qualified me as an expert and incorrectly relied on anecdote, not data.

For both methadone and buprenorphine, access is highly limited. Only 30,000 physicians are licensed to prescribe buprenorphine, but most who are licensed don’t prescribe it and each is currently limited to seeing 100 patients. When used for addiction treatment, methadone is regulated to an extraordinary degree — it’s illegal to prescribe outside of those rundown clinics, and NIMBYism keeps them located in poor neighborhoods.

Minneapolis fans: Prince’s legacy ‘will live on’

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One day after music icon Prince was found dead at his suburban Minnesota compound, music fans were still in shock, as memorials grew. (McKenna Ewen/The Washington Post)

To top it all off, the 12-step support groups that addicted people are urged or even required to attend as part of treatment often see people on maintenance as not “really” in recovery.

These practices are deadly. We’ve got to get over the idea that medication for opioid addiction simply “replaces one addiction with another” and doesn’t count as getting better. To do so, we need a far better understanding of what addiction really means.

In many people’s minds — due to concepts popular in the ’70s and early ’80s — addiction means physically needing a substance to function and becoming physically ill when deprived of it. From this perspective, the biggest barrier to quitting is suffering through the nausea, pain, shaking and diarrhea that accompany withdrawal. And, from this point of view, people who are on maintenance treatments are actually “still addicted.” But this definition of addiction was dropped by experts long ago.

One reason this view fell out of favor was the rise of crack cocaine. Cocaine and stimulants, like methamphetamine, don’t cause physical withdrawal symptoms — if addicted people suddenly stop taking them, they don’t get physically ill. However, they absolutely experience irritability, anxiety and craving that is every bit as intense and likely to lead to relapse as that associated with alcohol or opioids. This makes stimulants like crack highly addictive.

Though we tend to think otherwise, physical withdrawal isn’t the main barrier to abstinence; instead, craving and the sense that drugs are essential for emotional survival are at the core of addiction. In my own case, I put myself through withdrawal from heroin addiction at least six times. Never once during these attempts did I relapse while ill. Instead, I returned to drugs after withdrawal illness had passed — not because I felt physically bad, but because I had convinced myself that “just once” would be okay.

So what is addiction if it isn’t defined by tolerance or withdrawal? Psychiatry, through its diagnostic manual, the DSM, sums it up as compulsive behavior that recurs despite negative consequences. This means that maintenance helps users conquer their addiction by replacing addictive compulsion with physical dependence.

Craving, obsession, intoxication and consequences are gone; tolerance and steady dosing mean that patients are not impaired and can drive, care for families and work. What remains is a physical need for the substance to avoid withdrawal.

And such dependence isn’t harmful, per se: We’re all physically dependent on oxygen, food and water, and some of us (like yours truly) are physically dependent on antidepressants or other types of medication. If the consequences of physical dependence are positive, it’s not addiction. Which is why I don’t sit around dreaming of Prozac, yearning for my next dose, taking more and more and hiding my obsessive behavior.

Of course, like any other addiction treatment, maintenance doesn’t always lead to recovery. Indeed, as with abstinence-only treatment — though at a lower rate — relapse is the most common outcome.

Importantly, however, unlike in abstinence-only treatment, patients benefit from maintenance even during relapses. That’s because, whether or not people continue taking other drugs in an addictive fashion, the tolerance provided by maintenance pharmacologically makes overdose death much less likely.

The ongoing use of other drugs during relapse explains why so many people see maintenance as a failure and maintenance patients as being constantly high — but retaining relapsers in treatment is a feature, not a bug. It reduces mortality, disease and crime and keeps patients in health care.

Unfortunately, most families and friends of addicted people don’t understand this. They tend to seek abstinence-only inpatient rehab because maintenance is stigmatized, and the media rarely highlights its dramatic reduction in mortality. Instead, we hear about relapse or people selling their maintenance medications on the street. Ironically, that street market exists primarily because we don’t make maintenance accessible enough. Maintenance drugs wouldn’t be valuable if people who wanted them could get them, whether or not they are ready for abstinence.

Prince’s death was awful enough. A man lost his life, we lost a great artist — and we also lost the chance for him to model and destigmatize the best treatment we currently have for addiction.

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Buprenorphine for pain is it legal or not? Why the restrictions?

 

pills

I read the conclusions on the studies that Prince’s would-be doctor wrote about his use of Buprenorphrine for pain. It’s been FDA approved for pain, one article said. It’s been around and FDA approved for pain since 1981, another article said, that a doc just needs the regular ol dea certificated to prescribe it ‘off label.’ If it’s FDA approved for pain, then why is that application ‘off label?’  The more I read about this, the more betrayed I feel by my healthcare providers, all of them.  I wrote Prince’s would be doc a letter and poked around the net for providers. This thing stinks. There’s a story here.

The drug was developed in the UK for the treatment of chronic pain in 1971. That’s when our FDA approved it too.  There is a restriction on how many docs can use it. One article said 30 patients at a time and another said 100.00. For addiction, the doc needs a class and special certificate. For chronic pain, as I just said, a regular DEA cert is all any MD, particularly a primary, needs. The transition from one to the other is touchy.

Most of the phone numbers on the net were disconnected and another doctor said that it’s illegal to use buprenorphrine for pain. He was an ass, too. Then I spoke to another practice who uses Buprenorphrine for pain and charges 175 a mo…because in a month’s time, you might need quite a few med adjustments and visits. Another doc charged 350 for first three visits. The price of a tablet of subutex, which is for chronic

Today’s drama: If Prince had Buprenorphine…sooner he’d still b alive

prince

This relates to all the hysteria about opiates and the lack of attention paid to the treatment of chronic pain. Yes, Deb at CDC, noncancerchronicpainlivesmatter.

Prince may not have died in vain. From reading articles I found he and I had a lot in common. Chronic pain from too much over exertion. Mine is in my back. I am a responsible, steady, minimalist user and have reduced my dose by 2/3 as well as frequency. But the side effects are terrible and have finally caught up to me. How does this relate to Prince? Well, there is a guy who has stuck his neck out on the line, a maverick in the treatment of chronic pain using Suboxone and or Buprenorphine. Less side effects, no intoxication like the quick acting Vicodin, Tylenol 3 and 4, and Percocet and those lovable blues, the oxys. Those get ya high. Hook you in. I know first hand because I got off of them. Prince’s people had contacted Howard Feldman, whose treatment center is outpatient “Recovery Without Walls”  For anyone who has been in 12 step groups, the ‘abstinence only’ idea is great in theory but what do you do for the pain once you get off the pills? According to the literature and the studies and conclusions of his, there have been outside pressures restricting the use of this drug. A doc has to be licensed and can only prescribe it for 100 people. I found out yesterday that my hoity toity upscale pain clinic doesn’t have a license for it and my questions about a healthier non opiate alternative were met with skeptical frowns. Dr. Kornfeld’s son, Andrew, flew out to Paisley Park with an initial dose of Buprenorphine in his pocket to show Prince that he wouldn’t be dealing with terrible pain but Prince had one last go before the life saving mission was able to save him from himself. Basically guys, Buprenorphine is Methadone light, saves lives…by 75%, reduces disease transmission and if it had been more widely available instead of an insider’s secret he might still be alive today.

What do I do? In my next post, I’m going to show you the letter I am writing to the good doctor to try to find someone here in South Florida. It’s intimate and has awful details but maybe someone will relate to it.

Allison

Today’s drama: If Prince had Buprenorphine…sooner he’d still b alive

prince

 

Prince may not have died in vain. From reading articles I found he and I had a lot in common. Chronic pain from too much over exertion. Mine is in my back. I am a responsible, steady, minimalist user and have reduced my dose by 2/3 as well as frequency. But the side effects are terrible and have finally caught up to me. How does this relate to Prince? Well, there is a guy who has stuck his neck out on the line, a maverick in the treatment of chronic pain using Suboxone and or Buprenorphine. Less side effects, no intoxication like the quick acting Vicodin, Tylenol 3 and 4, and Percocet and those lovable blues, the oxys. Those get ya high. Hook you in. I know first hand because I got off of them. Prince’s people had contacted Howard Feldman, whose treatment center is outpatient “Recovery Without Walls”  For anyone who has been in 12 step groups, the ‘abstinence only’ idea is great in theory but what do you do for the pain once you get off the pills? According to the literature and the studies and conclusions of his, there have been outside pressures restricting the use of this drug. A doc has to be licensed and can only prescribe it for 100 people. I found out yesterday that my hoity toity upscale pain clinic doesn’t have a license for it and my questions about a healthier non opiate alternative were met with skeptical frowns. Dr. Kornfeld’s son, Andrew, flew out to Paisley Park with an initial dose of Buprenorphine in his pocket to show Prince that he wouldn’t be dealing with terrible pain but Prince had one last go before the life saving mission was able to save him from himself. Basically guys, Buprenorphine is Methadone light, saves lives…by 75%, reduces disease transmission and if it had been more widely available instead of an insider’s secret he might still be alive today.

What do I do? In my next post, I’m going to show you the letter I am writing to the good doctor to try to find someone here in South Florida. It’s intimate and has awful details but maybe someone will relate to it.

Allison

The Fate of HBO’s “Vinyl” produced by Mick Jagger/Martin Scorcese

It’s not looking good for Vinyl. Which sucks. Totally great show. Hard to watch but then so was House, M.D. The magazine Vanity Fair said the project had been kicking around since the late 80’s in the imagination of Mick and Martin.

Another critic said the show is full of pastiche, a shoddy imitation. ‘Surface,’ ‘Superficial’ or ‘representational’ as opposed to being AUTHENTIC. I totally disagree. There were so many of us how could we be ‘real’ with everyone?  Record company guys, by nature, had to be full of shit. And we radio decision makers who chose the songs or were strongarmed into playing them….we were just as full of it. Looking back, I know I was. I enjoyed being pandered to and pampered completely.

Allison Strong's photo.