More on Prince ; Buprenorphine Mystery my note 2 Cornell MD

princetwoBelieve me, you’ll know as soon as I know.

There is this guy in our daily paper who offers answers to questions. I wrote my questions about buprenorphine. I can never get the spelling right.

One of the articles about Prince’s death dealt with the stigma of using one drug to treat a problem with another. But if he really had ruined his hips and was in pain, then he’d have needed pain care. You want to know what I think? He didn’t know who to trust. It’s tricky. You’ll see in this letter that I don’t know who to trust either.  So I wrote this guy at Cornell. I keep looking for more stories on this subject but can’t find any. Is there some conspiracy theory I’m unaware of? Could big pharma be THAT big to get in the way of generic 40 dollar a month w/o insurance priced Subutex? It’s been FDA approved for chronic pain since 81 so what’s the big issue with it? So I wrote a letter to this Cornell ‘ask the doctor’ newspaper guy at ‘ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu. If you want to know the deal as badly as I do and you never see his answer posted in my blog, feel free to ask him again these questions..It’s a public concern and a growing epidemic that some say could be solved with Suboxone, Bupenorphrine. Why Not? Why?

Dear Dr. Roach

I’ve had chronic lumbar pain for a decade. It’s impacted by a neurological condition called Tardive Dyskinesia that’s similar to Parkinson’s. I have uncontrollable muscle spasms and yelp. I’ve had every interventional pain management injection available and have spent thousands on physical therapy, pilates, herbs, eat an anti inflammatory diet, have done chiropractic, massage and acupuncture. I use mindful meditation while listening to music to. Still,  I need my meds. And hate that.

I don’t take short actings. I’ve made days-long medication ‘vacations’ to work my tolerance/dose down to 1/3 of what it was a year ago.  Even at a lower dose, the constipation is unbearable. Even on an all raw foods diet.

After a few ortho surgeries I’d been on high dose synthetics like Demerol and I had no constipation. When Prince died I read about the use of buprenorphine for chronic pain at the California “Recovery Without Walls” clinic. The use of a sublingual patch, a different way of taking it puts less strain on the liver and kidneys as they don’t have to metabolize it.  The few shreds of coverage I read in the Washington Post and said Bupenorphine  received FDA approval for chronic pain back in 1981. Yet one article about a D.C. based doctor recounted how she’d had to falsify patient’s diagnoses in order to get them treated and off of opiates for good. That’s what I want. If these synthetics truly are the second coming for long term noncancerous pain (Claimed by the newer “Butrans” transdermal patch) with a lower side effect profile and a ceiling on respiratory effects and overdose potential, why do the doctors using it claim there have been ‘challenges and conflicts’ preventing its’  widespread availability and use?

Why do some local doctors (often trained in other countries) insinuate that bupenorphrine would help my chronic pain while other doctors angrily claim it’s illegal to use it for that purpose? What are the downsides to this medication that I’m not hearing about? Allison Strong Hollywood Florida 954-922-4310

biszanta@hotmail.com

 

More on Prince & Buprenorphine Mystery my note 2 Cornell MD

princetwoBelieve me, you’ll know as soon as I know.

There is this guy in our daily paper who offers answers to questions. I wrote my questions about buprenorphine. I can never get the spelling right.

One of the articles about Prince’s death dealt with the stigma of using one drug to treat a problem with another. But if he really had ruined his hips and was in pain, then he’d have needed pain care. You want to know what I think? He didn’t know who to trust. It’s tricky. You’ll see in this letter that I don’t know who to trust either.  So I wrote this guy at Cornell. I keep looking for more stories on this subject but can’t find any. Is there some conspiracy theory I’m unaware of? Could big pharma be THAT big to get in the way of generic 40 dollar a month w/o insurance priced Subutex? It’s been FDA approved for chronic pain since 81 so what’s the big issue with it? So I wrote a letter to this Cornell ‘ask the doctor’ newspaper guy at ‘ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu. If you want to know the deal as badly as I do and you never see his answer posted in my blog, feel free to ask him again these questions..It’s a public concern and a growing epidemic that some say could be solved with Suboxone, Bupenorphrine. Why Not? Why?

Dear Dr. Roach

I’ve had chronic lumbar pain for a decade. It’s impacted by a neurological condition called Tardive Dyskinesia that’s similar to Parkinson’s. I have uncontrollable muscle spasms and yelp. I’ve had every interventional pain management injection available and have spent thousands on physical therapy, pilates, herbs, eat an anti inflammatory diet, have done chiropractic, massage and acupuncture. I use mindful meditation while listening to music to. Still,  I need my meds. And hate that.

I don’t take short actings. I’ve made days-long medication ‘vacations’ to work my tolerance/dose down to 1/3 of what it was a year ago.  Even at a lower dose, the constipation is unbearable. Even on an all raw foods diet.

After a few ortho surgeries I’d been on high dose synthetics like Demerol and I had no constipation. When Prince died I read about the use of buprenorphine for chronic pain at the California “Recovery Without Walls” clinic. The use of a sublingual patch, a different way of taking it puts less strain on the liver and kidneys as they don’t have to metabolize it.  The few shreds of coverage I read in the Washington Post and said Bupenorphine  received FDA approval for chronic pain back in 1981. Yet one article about a D.C. based doctor recounted how she’d had to falsify patient’s diagnoses in order to get them treated and off of opiates for good. That’s what I want. If these synthetics truly are the second coming for long term noncancerous pain (Claimed by the newer “Butrans” transdermal patch) with a lower side effect profile and a ceiling on respiratory effects and overdose potential, why do the doctors using it claim there have been ‘challenges and conflicts’ preventing its’  widespread availability and use?

Why do some local doctors (often trained in other countries) insinuate that bupenorphrine would help my chronic pain while other doctors angrily claim it’s illegal to use it for that purpose? What are the downsides to this medication that I’m not hearing about? Allison Strong Hollywood Florida 954-922-4310

biszanta@hotmail.com

 

There’s another side to me…art therapy w/jewelry and cooking and more

pompano

 

If you have been following this blog for a while you might think I’m married to a life of battle against the ‘powers that be.’ Back when I was on Tumblr I posted a lot about my lighter side, jewelry making, pilates, and gourmet cooking, one of my passions. We have this store in town called Penn Dutch. They have the best, most highly trafficked (this makes for fresher fish because it’s always being replaced by new hauls) fish counter I’ve ever seen. Yesterday they had 9 Oz LobsterTails from South America, not Australia. They carry a Brazilian fish called Branzino that I’ve never heard of.

Yesterday I bought a fish native to here, South Florida, called Pompano. (pictured) it’s only 6.99 a pound, you purchase the whole fish and get two 6oz filets out of it. They filet it for you. What I do is buy coconut milk, fresh mint, and chili paste. I add more splenda to the mixture and heat it up. Then I put dissolved cornstarch in it and pour it over the fish and put it in the oven. I make steamed vegetables and rice, and the extra coconut milk sauce goes good over both. Mike my husband really likes this.

I had to stand at a fish counter with a number tag in my hand for 1/2 hour as this store is crowded. But that’s what makes the fish counter so fresh. Nothing sits there very long.

 

There’s another side to me…art therapy w/jewelry and cooking and more

pompano

 

If you have been following this blog for a while you might think I’m married to a life of battle against the ‘powers that be.’ Back when I was on Tumblr I posted a lot about my lighter side, jewelry making, pilates, and gourmet cooking, one of my passions. We have this store in town called Penn Dutch. They have the best, most highly trafficked (this makes for fresher fish because it’s always being replaced by new hauls) fish counter I’ve ever seen. Yesterday they had 9 Oz LobsterTails from South America, not Australia. They carry a Brazilian fish called Branzino that I’ve never heard of.

Yesterday I bought a fish native to here, South Florida, called Pompano. (pictured) it’s only 6.99 a pound, you purchase the whole fish and get two 6oz filets out of it. They filet it for you. What I do is buy coconut milk, fresh mint, and chili paste. I add more splenda to the mixture and heat it up. Then I put dissolved cornstarch in it and pour it over the fish and put it in the oven. I make steamed vegetables and rice, and the extra coconut milk sauce goes good over both. Mike my husband really likes this.

I had to stand at a fish counter with a number tag in my hand for 1/2 hour as this store is crowded. But that’s what makes the fish counter so fresh. Nothing sits there very long.

 

Nami Broward County, needing help with Newsletter & asking for general volunteers Ignores Me.

AllisonBlackandWhite

 

I just could not resist this one. At the NAMI meeting at the Drop In Center they always ask for volunteers to organize and chair their “connections” meetings, need someone to do their newsletter and all phone calls I’ve made to them (five in all) have gone unreturned. “She’s trouble,” She’s got Tardive Dyskinesia and she’s Angry…” I know because well, you’ll read it in the email I just sent them, accusing them of discrimination against me for being slightly vocal about Tardive Dyskineisa. I don’t mention it everywhere I go…but I do speak up. It’s real. I have it. There are ways to delay or avoid it and still take your medicine. That’s what I want to get across. But now I’m asking..how do you think they will respond to this email? I would lay odds they will continue to ignore me like they have the past two years.

 

Dear David and Edna

I haven’t heard anything since I did the telephone interview and left David a Followup message on ‘starting small’ to work towards a common goal. I feel that because I have Tardive Dyskinesia and occasionally mention it, I am being discriminated against.

 

This happens in the medical and psychiatric community as well. I am the face of a frightening, at times grotesque statistic, even though I’m asymptomatic and pretty happy about life.

 

I’m not angry. it happened, It took three years to get help and I did a series of friendly, low key  videos for International Bipolar Foundations’s Youtube page how to find that ‘needle in the haystack:” the neurologist who is a movement disorder specialist who further specialized in Tardive Dyskinesia, comfortable treating the mentally ill. Not all neurologists are, my friends.
I had a nurse practitioner tell me she wouldn’t take me on for fear of ending up in some bitter lawsuit if I got worse under her care and have been thrown out of every office where I simply sought a second opinion. I’ve had the same collaborative psychiatrist for seventeen years and have stayed out of the hospital for that long as well.

 

When I’m in bipolar depression remission I am still able to go places, write and do telephone outreach, so I take my lumps when I get them. But having volunteered for years at Rebel’s and suddenly being deemed ‘too unstable’ to do so again when their other volunteers pass drugs in the parking lot and call me to tell me the FBI or CIA is after them, well, one has to ask if I’m too unstable or just too threatening.

 

I don’t mean to be any trouble. It’s too bad that you can’t even find the time to call back. It’s disheartening, to say the least.

 

Allison Strong

Under the Bridge in Kabul-opiate addiction

 

 

Addicts languishing on the banks of the Kabul River

afganaddictsAnyone remember the song about addiction and homelessness by The Red Hot Chili Peppers called “Under the Bridge?” Here we go again.

Man, I thought heroin addicts had it rough in this country. At least we have Methadone clinics for the overflow of addicts who can’t actually kick. That program reduces the spread of illness, so even though it’s less than perfect, it’s a long term temporary solution for some addicts who don’t ‘graduate’ to sobriety, such as it is.

In Afghanistan, cheap heroin, easy access, unemployment, lack of housing, fraying families, malnutrition, and untreated mental illnesses are just a few factors of the epidemic most vividly illustrated by a New York Times piece about the heroin addicts gathering in informal ‘drug camps’ under the bridges of the River Kabul. It’s gotten to be such an eyesore that other residents line up on the bridges to watch. Schadenfreud. Again.

It’s said that  you walk on the riverbank you can hear the crunch of hundreds of thousands dirty needles underfoot. Afghanistan is the world’s largest producer of opiates and reports say 12% or more adults there are addicted.

Something’s being done about it but it will just staunch the bleeding. These people are rounded up and being sent to some ad hoc sort of treatment program at an empty United States Military base from 2003.

When the base was abandoned apparently we took all the goodies, televisions, kitchens, but they are doing the best they can. They are only allowed to stay for 180 days and there are no aftercare programs to help prevent relapse.

When I read the part about the needles crunching underfoot, I got a powerful visual.