More on Prince ; Buprenorphine Mystery my note 2 Cornell MD

princetwoBelieve me, you’ll know as soon as I know.

There is this guy in our daily paper who offers answers to questions. I wrote my questions about buprenorphine. I can never get the spelling right.

One of the articles about Prince’s death dealt with the stigma of using one drug to treat a problem with another. But if he really had ruined his hips and was in pain, then he’d have needed pain care. You want to know what I think? He didn’t know who to trust. It’s tricky. You’ll see in this letter that I don’t know who to trust either.  So I wrote this guy at Cornell. I keep looking for more stories on this subject but can’t find any. Is there some conspiracy theory I’m unaware of? Could big pharma be THAT big to get in the way of generic 40 dollar a month w/o insurance priced Subutex? It’s been FDA approved for chronic pain since 81 so what’s the big issue with it? So I wrote a letter to this Cornell ‘ask the doctor’ newspaper guy at ‘ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu. If you want to know the deal as badly as I do and you never see his answer posted in my blog, feel free to ask him again these questions..It’s a public concern and a growing epidemic that some say could be solved with Suboxone, Bupenorphrine. Why Not? Why?

Dear Dr. Roach

I’ve had chronic lumbar pain for a decade. It’s impacted by a neurological condition called Tardive Dyskinesia that’s similar to Parkinson’s. I have uncontrollable muscle spasms and yelp. I’ve had every interventional pain management injection available and have spent thousands on physical therapy, pilates, herbs, eat an anti inflammatory diet, have done chiropractic, massage and acupuncture. I use mindful meditation while listening to music to. Still,  I need my meds. And hate that.

I don’t take short actings. I’ve made days-long medication ‘vacations’ to work my tolerance/dose down to 1/3 of what it was a year ago.  Even at a lower dose, the constipation is unbearable. Even on an all raw foods diet.

After a few ortho surgeries I’d been on high dose synthetics like Demerol and I had no constipation. When Prince died I read about the use of buprenorphine for chronic pain at the California “Recovery Without Walls” clinic. The use of a sublingual patch, a different way of taking it puts less strain on the liver and kidneys as they don’t have to metabolize it.  The few shreds of coverage I read in the Washington Post and said Bupenorphine  received FDA approval for chronic pain back in 1981. Yet one article about a D.C. based doctor recounted how she’d had to falsify patient’s diagnoses in order to get them treated and off of opiates for good. That’s what I want. If these synthetics truly are the second coming for long term noncancerous pain (Claimed by the newer “Butrans” transdermal patch) with a lower side effect profile and a ceiling on respiratory effects and overdose potential, why do the doctors using it claim there have been ‘challenges and conflicts’ preventing its’  widespread availability and use?

Why do some local doctors (often trained in other countries) insinuate that bupenorphrine would help my chronic pain while other doctors angrily claim it’s illegal to use it for that purpose? What are the downsides to this medication that I’m not hearing about? Allison Strong Hollywood Florida 954-922-4310

biszanta@hotmail.com

 

More on Prince & Buprenorphine Mystery my note 2 Cornell MD

princetwoBelieve me, you’ll know as soon as I know.

There is this guy in our daily paper who offers answers to questions. I wrote my questions about buprenorphine. I can never get the spelling right.

One of the articles about Prince’s death dealt with the stigma of using one drug to treat a problem with another. But if he really had ruined his hips and was in pain, then he’d have needed pain care. You want to know what I think? He didn’t know who to trust. It’s tricky. You’ll see in this letter that I don’t know who to trust either.  So I wrote this guy at Cornell. I keep looking for more stories on this subject but can’t find any. Is there some conspiracy theory I’m unaware of? Could big pharma be THAT big to get in the way of generic 40 dollar a month w/o insurance priced Subutex? It’s been FDA approved for chronic pain since 81 so what’s the big issue with it? So I wrote a letter to this Cornell ‘ask the doctor’ newspaper guy at ‘ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu. If you want to know the deal as badly as I do and you never see his answer posted in my blog, feel free to ask him again these questions..It’s a public concern and a growing epidemic that some say could be solved with Suboxone, Bupenorphrine. Why Not? Why?

Dear Dr. Roach

I’ve had chronic lumbar pain for a decade. It’s impacted by a neurological condition called Tardive Dyskinesia that’s similar to Parkinson’s. I have uncontrollable muscle spasms and yelp. I’ve had every interventional pain management injection available and have spent thousands on physical therapy, pilates, herbs, eat an anti inflammatory diet, have done chiropractic, massage and acupuncture. I use mindful meditation while listening to music to. Still,  I need my meds. And hate that.

I don’t take short actings. I’ve made days-long medication ‘vacations’ to work my tolerance/dose down to 1/3 of what it was a year ago.  Even at a lower dose, the constipation is unbearable. Even on an all raw foods diet.

After a few ortho surgeries I’d been on high dose synthetics like Demerol and I had no constipation. When Prince died I read about the use of buprenorphine for chronic pain at the California “Recovery Without Walls” clinic. The use of a sublingual patch, a different way of taking it puts less strain on the liver and kidneys as they don’t have to metabolize it.  The few shreds of coverage I read in the Washington Post and said Bupenorphine  received FDA approval for chronic pain back in 1981. Yet one article about a D.C. based doctor recounted how she’d had to falsify patient’s diagnoses in order to get them treated and off of opiates for good. That’s what I want. If these synthetics truly are the second coming for long term noncancerous pain (Claimed by the newer “Butrans” transdermal patch) with a lower side effect profile and a ceiling on respiratory effects and overdose potential, why do the doctors using it claim there have been ‘challenges and conflicts’ preventing its’  widespread availability and use?

Why do some local doctors (often trained in other countries) insinuate that bupenorphrine would help my chronic pain while other doctors angrily claim it’s illegal to use it for that purpose? What are the downsides to this medication that I’m not hearing about? Allison Strong Hollywood Florida 954-922-4310

biszanta@hotmail.com