Bowie, my BFF and Taking stock of being a Rebel

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I didn’t want to be one of the many David Bowie Fans rushing to grab the stage for themselves. His death really affected me. I’m so sad he’s gone but he made art out of pain until the very end. I adored his ‘plastic’ soul phase of the “Young Americans” album…it was the first David Bowie album I bought. Then I got into his lead guitarit “Mick Ronson” and loved his solo song, “The Empty Bed.” You can’t find it anymore. David wrote songs for acts in the Underground and helped them break through. Good examples of this are his collaborative work with Lou Reed, Brian Eno, and Iggy Pop. He was generous that way. He felt there was room for everyone. rebel

I always considered myself an outsider. The music of David Bowie in the 70’s, along with Pink Floyd, Led Zepplin, Foghat, The Eagles and other groups in the 70’s, normalized my experience of myself. I was and forever will be grateful to them. It encouraged the artist in me.

However, due to my BFF and the passing of Scott Weiland from STP and David Bowie, I’m re examining the theme of my blog.

Rebel. Hmmmmm. Rebel against what, exactly? And what in the heck is positive about that?

Questioning and raging against the status quo is what has fueled popular and underground music (my favorite) since the 50’s. Beginning with Elvis, The Beatles, Going into Led Zepplin, Nirvana, Bowie, Billy Idol and even the softer sounds of Duran Duran.

My personal opinion is that artists have an uncanny ability to take pain and give it purpose in their art, connecting to others who feel similarly….or feel at all, and find meaning in it.

But I’m re examining useless rebellion, that’s all. I’m for change but think twitter hashtag campaigns only speak to the choir and protests outside the gates of pharmaceutical companies only make us look more crazy.

I’ve written letters to senators and am looking for an online Civics course to see how our government really works when it comes to affecting Change and checks and balances.

I’m on a Charlotte Rampling Kick

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The hostess of horror is back with a new film, “45 Years”

Charlotte Rampling specializes in roles that attempt to normalize the most horrific. I call her the ‘hostess of horror.’

I became aware of her when I saw a Mickey Roarke Robert Deniro movie about selling one’s soul to the devil (an old theme if ever there was one) and she played a New Orleans Voodooienne who met her bloody end before they could extract her prophesies and spells. I learned about her role in “The Night Porter,” Reveled in her role as serial killer “Dexter’s” unconditionally approving, supportive and loving psychiatrist who specialized in childhood trauma and two recent films: The role of the stern, black and white “Women Must Endure these things” mother of Keira Knightly in “The Duchess.” It’s a terrific film also starring Ralph Fiennes as the uncouth Duke she is forced into marriage with. Then another film with Keira Knightly called “Never Let me Go” about using British Orphans solely for the purpose of organ donation. She played the head of the institution that schooled these orphans into thinking they were serving a high purpose parting with their parts one by one until they weakened and died. Now she’s back in a movie about a wonderful marriage shattered by something horrific. I can’t wait to see it.

She’s the model of a cosmetics campaign for Nas Cosmetics, joining octogenarian Joan Didion as a fine example of the grace of aging. What could be better for us? Sometimes life is horrible but we have to make the best of it and see light in the dark, as she seems to.

Music I relate to.

My regular alternative podcast is not streaming properly. So I am trying out a KROQ2 Online Station to write with. I always here something I used to really relate to, something that kept me alive when my meds stopped working.

Try this:

There are flies on the windscreen.

There are lambs for the slaughter.

Death is everywhere,

There are flies on the windscreen, for a start

reminding us…

That we could torn apart

tonight.

Come here, Kiss Me, Now….

Death is everywere.

The more I look

the more I feel a sense of urgency.

Tonite.

Come here, kiss me now.

Come here, kiss me, now.

Lyrics from Depeche Mode’s “Fly on the Windscreen,” a real gloom and doomer.

Now it’s Billy Idol.

“Flies on The Windscreen” a secondary single…played on radio here and there.

My Dark Side: Nirvana, Morrissey and Nine Inch Nails

As I drove to the gym yesterday listening to Sirius’s “Lithium,” Nirvana’s rarely heard “on a plain” was blasting in my car stereo. Sirius, expensive but worth it. Then came Nine Inch Nail’s “Head like a Hole,” which made me turn the radio up even louder. I was lucky to be able to play these songs on the radio, first because they were good, but I was recently diagnosed with bipolar disorder and could really relate. Later when someone published that Trent Reznor (Nine Inch Nail’s visionary) was dx with bipolar disorder and didn’t want to take medicine, I could really understand. That raw pain he expressed in his music, the rage and fury of betrayal in “Terrible Lie,” he probably didn’t want to lose that.

My Dark Side: Nirvana, Morrissey and Nine Inch Nails

As I drove to the gym yesterday listening to Sirius’s “Lithium,” Nirvana’s rarely heard “on a plain” was blasting in my car stereo. Sirius, expensive but worth it. Then came Nine Inch Nail’s “Head like a Hole,” which made me turn the radio up even louder. I was lucky to be able to play these songs on the radio, first because they were good, but I was recently diagnosed with bipolar disorder and could really relate. Later when someone published that Trent Reznor (Nine Inch Nail’s visionary) was dx with bipolar disorder and didn’t want to take medicine, I could really understand. That raw pain he expressed in his music, the rage and fury of betrayal in “Terrible Lie,” he probably didn’t want to lose that.