A landslide of words midweek and more on the benefits of learning

 

allisoninClaudeMontanaHey you guys, do I look better as a blonde? ….off topic.

I forgot to mention that taking things up when we are more mature has one more benefit. While we’re beginning to realize our body’s are getting older and we are losing strength, among other things, we’re at least getting better, moving forward on SOMETHING.  And apparently that counts for a lot.

So many words this week I have to get them off my plate. Some of them will help my writing, like ‘Axiom’ or retrench. You’ll see.

Retrench: Reduce Government costs in response to a national economic downturn. Reminds me of Greek ‘austerity.’

Nostrum: a medicine that doesn’t work like ‘tonics’ in the old days.

Demagogue: Someone who appeals to people’s prejudice and deep desire.

Calligphygian; Nice buttocks??? That can’t be right.

Inmitable: Impossible to copy.’

Axiom: Well established fact or theory.

Promulgate: Promote

Aphorism: an astute observation.

Mandarin: A member of a cabal or empire, often secret. Like a meeting of top Cardinals in the Catholic Church or even Clerics in Islam.

Bloviate: To go on at length with empty, inflated promises or statements. Certainly not aphorisms.

RIP Ashraf Pahlavi

Photo of Ashraf Pahlavi, twin sister of the Shah of Iran

 

ashraf

 

We lost a proud Middle Eastern Feminist last week. The twin sister of the former Shah of Iran, Ashraf Pahlavi, passed away. I was interested that she wrote three memoirs.

Most people only write one, but she lived a long time, through many political changes that swept the world. I’m going to request:

“Faces in a Mirror: Memoirs from Exile”

“Time for Truth”

Jamais Resignee (Never Forget)…That’s a phrase used in another concept, but ok, it cross applies.

RIP Robert Spitzer MD who upgraded DSM’s into the future

The person most responsible for DSM’s leap into the mainstream passed away last week? His name was Robert Spitzer and I’ve run across three articles about his life and work.

When he tweaked DSMIII, he removed same sex orientation as a basis for a diagnosis. Gay rights speakers claim that if it hadn’t been for Dr. Spitzer, there would be no gay marriage today.

His work on DSMIII was a total departure from  overreliance on the unreliable: the wide spectrum of Freudian authority. With the updates of and additions to DSM3, the new framework for diagnostics was based on  a ‘checklist’ of symptoms. While not perfect, it is more accurate and leaves less territory wide open for speculation.

While my psychiatrist of fifteen years is a bit of a Freudian doc, many psychiatrists in the 70’s were frustrated with Freudian theory and the idea that someone had to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to lie on a couch and speak to a silent psychoanalyst for years on end.

Movie “Spotlight” causes worry re fate of investigative Journalism

There was an article that interviewed editors of many prominent newspapers about the fate of investigative journalism. Because print publications are converting into the more ‘now’ digital news, the instantly breaking kind of stuff, for a publication such as The Boston Globe or The New York Times to devote dollars for staff to conduct long-term investigative research into local issues or problems is up in the air. Though the article said that the New York Times is still dedicated to this public service, and a few others in the Midwest and Washington too, this public service: letting the public know about local crises covered up by corruption, abuse of power, the clout of churches, etc, is at risk.

 

As consumers, I think we need to keep supporting publications that provide that. That’s why I have a seven day a week print subscription to the New York Times and Read it every day. That’s where I hear the skinny on exactly WHY certain generic medication’s prices have risen by 4000%. How and Why that happened.

It’s happened to me. ali

More on Genetic Testing for Antidepressants and other meds

ali

 

 

This is a long post but what you read may help you out. I’m going back on the trail of researching and finding someone to do genetic testing on me for the best metabolized psych med in the event of my next bipolar depression due to antidepressant fatigue. My antidepressants last typically for a year or two and then poop out. I want to know, ahead of time, what would be the best pill to take. In the last five years, I’ve had incredible luck with Viibryd (2 years), Brintellix and Fetmiza. All of them worked in a week or less and lasted from 8 months to two years. Right now I’m on a combination of Wellbutrin (which I took effectively for a five year period starting fifteen years ago and Brintellix, which is a new drug that they don’t know exactly how it works but for me it was a ‘Rescue’ drug that I use for Code Black situations. I only take it twice a week.

Yes, I talk about meds a lot. Many people with mental illness are still sick, wondering if they are on the right medicine. this post is super long but it’s about a brand new way of finding ‘the right medicine’ that will work for you, as an individual, for your brain chemistry. I think it’s important.

 

Many of you know that I wrote a letter to my nearest location of a Mayo Clinic, in Jacksonville, Florida. I live near Miami, in Hollywood. My letter was ignored. At Mayo clinic, no matter what kind of health problem you go in for, genetic and enzyme testing is “the standard of care.”

No matter what, when you go to a Mayo Clinic,  they do genetic testing and enzyme testing to see what drugs, not what class of drugs-we already know if you need a a statin for high cholesterol for example, but which exact one, be it Lipitor or Zocor or Crestor…see what I mean? Narrowing it down to the exact brand or generic name.

It is important to narrow the possibilities or possibility down precisely to dose you with what YOUR body will metabolize the best.

The problem is that Mayo clinics aren’t taking any new patients and my request to be put on a waiting list when I tried both the Phoenix and Florida locations was met with, “We’re sorry, we aren’t taking new patients and there is no waiting list.”

This sounds like the VA. I wonder if they took pages from the same playbook. Sometimes the medical profession can be a cold, calculating place.

***

Back to the topic of finding the right or a new psych medicine if you’re in a depression relapse,

If the doctor just ‘guesses’ what he thinks might be right, (or which new drug has been promoted lately by a drug rep in whatever means they promote-I’m told Golf trips are sometimes involved), there’s a chance that your genetic makeup and or enzymes will not break down the drug it will just freefloat in your bloodstream;  jamming up your internal eliminatory organs, increasing toxicity, negative drug-drug interactions and (god help us) chronic, incurable side effects, like the Tardive Dyskinesia I took. The drug I think caused it was not real effective for me, so my dose was jacked up beyond the recommended top end, and I think that was the last thing I needed-I needed a different drug. This is why I got sick with TD and will have it for life.

What is ideal is finding a drug that your metabolism (read enzmes) breaks down into molecules small enough to pass through the blood-brain barrier, so it can do its’ work and make you whole again. This is very important.

I’ve heard Medicare pays for this testing but right now, but not every doctor who takes the measly compensation of Medicare reimbursement wants to deal with the extra paperwork.

 

And the ones that will do it that I talked to want ridiculous sums of money, like 500 bucks, to administer the tests, read the results and then prescribe the best drug.

Furthermore those types of ’boutique’ psychiatrists are often the ‘all cash’ ‘no insurance’ and certainly ‘no medicare insurance’ type and don’t do hospital rounds anywhere. That means, that if you are like me, Bipolar I, and might have to go inpatient, they don’t want to treat you. They way they put it to me last time I was depressed and worried I might have to go inpatient it was clear that they did not want ‘acute’ cases, as they put it.

 

They want the well educated, well heeled, well-off working professional with a mild mood disorder willing to come up with the cash each month for their med check.

Most of the seasoned, really competent good psychiatrists I know (and I’ve had ten second opinions while staying with the same doctor for fifteen years just to know who is out there) well, they’ve already done decades of hospital work and don’t do it anymore either!!!

Pre-retirement, they are reaping the rewards of their years of experience in the trenches, ministering to the very ill, like I was when I met my shrink of fifteen years.

He no longer accepts Medicare or Medicaid or insurance as of 3 years ago. On the plus side, there is continuity of care and I’ve not had to go inpatient for that period of time. Knock on wood.

***********************

But I digress again:

Back to the point of Genetic Testing: We’ve known for some time that not every medicine works for every person. Sadly, for psych patients in depression or a relapse into bipolar depression or schizo issues, it’s a painfully long period of trial and error.

Like I said, one time it took Dr. L to help dig me out of the dark. We tried this and that and in the end we tried another SSRI and I was one of the subgroups of the population who has to wait twelve weeks, not four, for the SSRI in this case, Prozac generic, to become effective. Whew, what a relief. If we had genetically tested me, it would have shown that Prozac would not have been a recommended choice. It only lasted a year anyhow and I had another relapse and switched yet again. I was lucky again. The first one we tried, worked. By the way, he’s cool, he knows I have a sixth sense and lets me help choose what he offers.

Recently I saw a testimonial to the effectivement of genetic testing in a reply to a post on International bipolar Foundation’s Facebook page. Those people, by the way, as well as bipolarhope.com, (bphope.com) are good resources for general and specific information on all sorts of things.

Not to be deterred by the fact that my local mayo clinic’s chief of psychiatry ignored my letter, I’m going to try again. I’m going to announce my journalism credentials and tell them I’ve got both a personal and profession interest in testing to find out which antidepressant would be best in the need of diggin out of my next bipolar depression.

My last one was in April and lasted until July. It was shorter than the year-long one in 2005, but unendurable just the same. I considered suicide every day.

You guys might think I’m strong, like my name but that’s an aspiration. I’m actually not.

I have severe chronic pain and some days I worry about the day coming where I’ve outlived my body’s usefulness and can go no more.

With all the crazy healthy lifestyle choices like raw foods diet, daily exercise and weight training (even though I hate it), I have this feeling I’ll live to be 90,  accumulating more side effects from the medicines for side effects.

I’m already swimming in a sea of them. Once again, side effects or the absence of them, can be traced to finding, as Nine Inch Nail’s Trent Reznor said, “The Perfect Drug.”

(For Tardive Dyskinesia info it’s both on IBPF Youtube channel under “Tardive Dyskinesia” part one, symptoms and cause and statistics and part 2, Getting treatment and the Website, ibpf.com “Move Over Movement Disorder).

I’m going to try again to get them to see me, even though they say they are taking no patients.

I’ll let you know what happens and when it happens. If this shit didn’t work, no one would be doing it.

Reading Material “The End of Illness” David Agus, M.D.

He has his own company that does testing and it’s expensive. ali

Movies about what it means to be French.

I was doing movie listings and mini reviews, but had a huge flare up of back pain and had to cut back. I will pick it up again soon…like in a few days. The list is enormous because it’s the holidays. I try to weed the most obviously marketing action adventures out unless they have redeeming qualities.

The New York Times has now reviewed Amazon Prime’s “The Man in the High Castle” three times. It’s a ‘what if’ Holocaust tale about America in the early 60’s, after the Nazis and Japanese won WWII. The Japanese have the west coast and the Nazi’s New York. Times Square has swastikas on all the glaring neon lights. Amazon Prime has promotions where you get a credit card with a 50 buck credit and a reduced rate. All said, we spent a total of 20 bucks for our annual membership.

Netflix’s original series, based on a Marvel Comic book, “Jessica Jones” does not disappoint. The character is multidimensional and even though she has superpowers, her active alcoholism is her Achilles heel.

The New York Times paid homage to Paris Friday in their movie section by listing some French Movies that show what it means to be French.

They are:

“Girlhood”

“Days of Glory”

“A prophet”

“Of Gods and Men.”